Monthly Archives: July 2011

A stranger in a strange land

Blogging as a temporary expat has its advantages: you can be dispassionate, give a good overview and have time to track back to find the reasons for any given situation. Spain was meant to be a five year sojourn at the most and, in the event, it was four years too many. Those years did me a favour though; they gave me the time to investigate and blog so, all in all, I wouldn’t say they were wasted.

Coming home, I find I’m a stranger in a strange land, moreso than I was in Spain. I’m just English and of no particular consequence. Time after time I walk around the Broadway (sadly, no carajillos, yachts or people-watching) and, perhaps I just choose the wrong time of day, but all I hear are Eastern European accents. I’ve also had a few Amazon deliveries since I’ve been back and very few of the couriers have had English as a first language. The last chap just grunted as he handed me the small pc to sign. If it weren’t for those Latvian cheekbones I’d have sworn he’d been an extra in Mel Brooks’ History of the World Part 1.

Not only have the people in the neighbourhood changed but politics has changed too. It’s more overt than it was when I left in 2005. I did have secret hopes that when I returned Blair would be gone and all would be back to ‘normal’ but, sadly, not so. Brown, Cameron and whoever comes next will all say the same things, mouth the same platitudes, use similar spin doctors, listen to the same lobby groups and take the same instructions from the EU while our own voices are ignored.  To paraphrase: The government is not for turning.

Like a child pestering a busy and negligent parent we tug on the government’s shirt sleeve and say, “Hey, don’t forget about me,” and the parent looks down, pats the child on the head and says, “There, there, everything will be fine in a minute…just give me a minute…” And we do; we go back to watching CBBC or counting our toes and we give them all the time in the world in which to fulfill their promises, to improve society in the way we’d like it to be improved. They’re listening, of course they are, and they’ll sort everything out once they have time.

All this Big Society and e-petitions is a scam; it’s a lie; it’s an illusion. It’s offered by a government in the pocket of someone else who views us as an impediment, an obstruction to their plans.

I don’t care if people think I’m a fruit-loop. I talk facts while politicians deal in truths – their truths; the BBC’s truths; the media’s truths. They tell us what the truths are and we’re supposed to respond with gratitude, all the while keeping our own truths to ourselves. This has to stop. We must stop playing their game of pretend. The three main political Parties in this country offer nothing for us. There’s no change of direction; no repeal of laws which are an anathema to most of us; no drawing back of the powers of local authorities.  It’s time for the English to re-discover their stroppy nature. The government says it wants to know what ‘Englishness’ is and it’s time we reminded them.

“Those people just ain’t your friends”:

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A Stranger In A Strange Land

Blogging as a temporary expat has its advantages: you can be dispassionate, give a good overview and have time to track back to find the reasons for any given situation. Spain was meant to be a five year sojourn at the most but, in the event, it was four years too many. Those years did me a favour though; they gave me the time to investigate and blog so, all in all, I wouldn’t say they were wasted.

Coming home, I find I’m a stranger in a strange land, moreso than I was in Spain. I’m just English and of no particular consequence. Time after time I walk around the Broadway (sadly, no carajillos, yachts or people-watching) and, perhaps I just choose the wrong time of day, but all I hear are Eastern European accents. I’ve also had a few Amazon deliveries since I’ve been back and very few of the couriers have had English as a first language. The last chap just grunted as he handed me the small pc to sign. If it weren’t for those Latvian cheekbones I’d have sworn he’d been an extra in Mel Brooks’ History of the World Part 1.

Not only have the people in the neighbourhood changed but politics has changed too. It’s more overt than it was when I left in 2005. I did have secret hopes that when I returned Blair would be gone and all would be back to ‘normal’ but, sadly, not so. Brown, Cameron and whoever comes next will all say the same things, mouth the same platitudes, use similar spin doctors, listen to the same lobby groups and take the same instructions from the EU while our own voices are ignored.  To paraphrase: The government is not for turning.

Like a child pestering a busy and negligent parent we tug on the government’s shirt sleeve and say, “Hey, don’t forget about me,” and the parent looks down, pats the child on the head and says, “There, there, everything will be fine in a minute…just give me a minute…” And we do; we go back to watching CBBC or counting our toes and we give them all the time in the world in which to fulfill their promises, to improve society in the way we’d like it to be improved. They’re listening, of course they are, and they’ll sort everything out once they have time.

All this Big Society and e-petitions is a scam; it’s a lie; it’s an illusion. It’s offered by a government in the pocket of someone else who views us as an impediment, an obstruction to their plans.

I don’t care if people think I’m a fruit-loop. I talk facts while politicians deal in truths – their truths; the BBC’s truths; the media’s truths. They tell us what the truths are and we’re supposed to respond with gratitude, all the while keeping our own truths to ourselves. This has to stop. We must stop playing their game of pretend. The three main political Parties in this country offer nothing for us. There’s no change of direction; no repeal of laws which are an anathema to most of us; no drawing back of the powers of local authorities.  It’s time for the English to re-discover their stroppy nature. The government says it wants to know what ‘Englishness’ is and it’s time we reminded them.

“Those people just ain’t your friends”:

Sunday Reflection


TheMG63

Sunday Reflection


TheMG63

Sunday Round-up

This week’s audio track, before Agenda 21 and Health & Safety kicked in:

A rap on the knuckles and a line in the sand. Blair & Campbell will be ‘criticised’ in the Autumn report from Chilcot’s Iraq Inquiry. More details emerge.

A morally bankrupt country is Blair’s lasting legacy. (No mention of Brown’s ‘legacy’: a financially bankrupt country). Well done, Labour spivs.

The Polecat calls for charges of false accounting against some bankers and comments on Blair & Brown’s “poisonous” legacies: “… a financially incontinent country, but one with a submerged underclass addicted to welfare. Ill-educated, ill-disciplined, near illiterate and innumerate unemployables living in families in which no one worked, ever had worked or wanted to work and living better than the working families next door.”

The Left’s re-defining of “far-right” continues and the internet and bloggers are still the baddie catalysts.

Has this been reported in the British msm? “Tens of thousands” march through Brussels in protest against austerity measures. So this is where John Monks (now Baron Monks thanks to Cameron) has gone – ETUC.

The National Museum of Scotland  re-opens after three years and £47m refurbishment.

“Care Tsar” entrusted to run 250 care homes for the elderly following collapse of Southern Cross has previously been involved in  maltreatment of residents.

“Ten years ago, acting on complaints from relatives and residents, we sent an undercover reporter in to 72-bed, £700-a- week Lynde House as a care assistant.
Complaints had been sent to Dr Patel and the company which owned the home over a period of three years beforehand. We found:
  • Sick and frail residents lying in their own waste for hours
  • Emergency call bells out of reach and vital lifting equipment not working
  • Residents staying in the same position so long that they developed bed sores.
After our investigation in 2001 Dr Patel sold his business, which owned 93 nursing homes, and resigned from his posts as government adviser on elderly care and consultant to Help the Aged”
But now, he’s back.

Cameron does a Brown when he gets date wrong. He didn’t even contact the parents himself to apologise: “The Prime Minister holds the Armed Forces in the highest regard and fully understands the sacrifices they make on a daily basis.”

The BBC,  a broadcasting law unto itself,  has been criticised for serving bullsh!t for breakfast.  A spokesman for the Today programme said: “E-mails including abusive language were included in the report to demonstrate the level of intimidation involved in the campaign. We felt this was editorially justified.”

Up to 10,000 jobs to go at HSBC  as it’s expected to report a drop of £0.3bn in profits.

Don’t be afraid of “stepping on cultural toes” in the fight against extremism, unless they’re English “cultural toes”

The hidden benefits of an SNP government: refreshing those parts other Parties cannot reach. No doubt Salmond will claim he has it in hand and the results show a clear vindication of his government’s policies.  Next week: dire warnings that the “London government” is proposing a tax.

I’ll have the ground floor garden flat, please: Britannia Royal Naval College is on the hit-list for cost-cutting.

MPs spend 1,000 hours a year on Twitter.  There’s precious little else  for them to do apart from open libraries and school fetes.

I’m alright, Jack! Unison boss Dave Prentice gets 31% pay rise.

Guide to Wild Britain

Libya
Norway
Kenya
Afghanistan
Somalia
Brussels

Obama runs debt debate to the wire in the USA “No money for troops”, yet he can implement a programme like this:

Finally, three from the MoS epitomising the true legacy of thirteen years of Labour government and which Cameron seems incapable or unwilling to do anything about:

“I can look after myself.”
Third Briton in a week falls from another balcony
Pond-life teens with no sense of right or wrong

Sunday Round-up

This week’s audio track, before Agenda 21 and Health & Safety kicked in:

A rap on the knuckles and a line in the sand. Blair & Campbell will be ‘criticised’ in the Autumn report from Chilcot’s Iraq Inquiry. More details emerge.

A morally bankrupt country is Blair’s lasting legacy. (No mention of Brown’s ‘legacy’: a financially bankrupt country). Well done, Labour spivs.

The Polecat calls for charges of false accounting against some bankers and comments on Blair & Brown’s “poisonous” legacies: “… a financially incontinent country, but one with a submerged underclass addicted to welfare. Ill-educated, ill-disciplined, near illiterate and innumerate unemployables living in families in which no one worked, ever had worked or wanted to work and living better than the working families next door.”

The Left’s re-defining of “far-right” continues and the internet and bloggers are still the baddie catalysts.

Has this been reported in the British msm? “Tens of thousands” march through Brussels in protest against austerity measures. So this is where John Monks (now Baron Monks thanks to Cameron) has gone – ETUC.

The National Museum of Scotland  re-opens after three years and £47m refurbishment.

“Care Tsar” entrusted to run 250 care homes for the elderly following collapse of Southern Cross has previously been involved in  maltreatment of residents.

“Ten years ago, acting on complaints from relatives and residents, we sent an undercover reporter in to 72-bed, £700-a- week Lynde House as a care assistant.
Complaints had been sent to Dr Patel and the company which owned the home over a period of three years beforehand. We found:
  • Sick and frail residents lying in their own waste for hours
  • Emergency call bells out of reach and vital lifting equipment not working
  • Residents staying in the same position so long that they developed bed sores.
After our investigation in 2001 Dr Patel sold his business, which owned 93 nursing homes, and resigned from his posts as government adviser on elderly care and consultant to Help the Aged”
But now, he’s back.

Cameron does a Brown when he gets date wrong. He didn’t even contact the parents himself to apologise: “The Prime Minister holds the Armed Forces in the highest regard and fully understands the sacrifices they make on a daily basis.”

The BBC,  a broadcasting law unto itself,  has been criticised for serving bullsh!t for breakfast.  A spokesman for the Today programme said: “E-mails including abusive language were included in the report to demonstrate the level of intimidation involved in the campaign. We felt this was editorially justified.”

Up to 10,000 jobs to go at HSBC  as it’s expected to report a drop of £0.3bn in profits.

Don’t be afraid of “stepping on cultural toes” in the fight against extremism, unless they’re English “cultural toes”

The hidden benefits of an SNP government: refreshing those parts other Parties cannot reach. No doubt Salmond will claim he has it in hand and the results show a clear vindication of his government’s policies.  Next week: dire warnings that the “London government” is proposing a tax.

I’ll have the ground floor garden flat, please: Britannia Royal Naval College is on the hit-list for cost-cutting.

MPs spend 1,000 hours a year on Twitter.  There’s precious little else  for them to do apart from open libraries and school fetes.

I’m alright, Jack! Unison boss Dave Prentice gets 31% pay rise.

Guide to Wild Britain

Libya
Norway
Kenya
Afghanistan
Somalia
Brussels

Obama runs debt debate to the wire in the USA “No money for troops”, yet he can implement a programme like this:

Finally, three from the MoS epitomising the true legacy of thirteen years of Labour government and which Cameron seems incapable or unwilling to do anything about:

“I can look after myself.”
Third Briton in a week falls from another balcony
Pond-life teens with no sense of right or wrong

Hungarian GP: 1989