WHEDFU Part 1

Strictly speaking it isn’t a WHEDFU because I came across other interesting snippets that I’m going to throw in at the end and they tend to be things we don’t hear about unless we go looking for them. Sometimes I think I know what it must be like to be an American in the back-hills of, oh, I don’t know, let’s say Tennessee, who doesn’t realise there’s a big bad world outside because local reporting is so selective.

I’d usually suggest settling down with a cup of tea for a long-ish WHEDFU but today I recommend something along the lines of a bottle of Scotch or a lightly-chilled Chablis.

First up is the reason why our msm will continue to be inward-looking for some time to come: NotW and another arrest

As Spanish PM Zapatero postpones his holiday and announces an early GE because of euro-zone problems, Italy is going down. Juncker has called an emergency meeting for tomorrow as he’s forced to acknowledge that the 2nd Greece bailout hasn’t worked. The EC says it is “confident”. All is well, go back to sleep.

The EU is hoping to mediate in Kosovo as fighting between Serbs and Albanians intensifies. Why don’t the Albanians go back to Albania (I know it still exists because Google tells me so).  In fact, why doesn’t everyone just go back to where they came from and we can start all over again? For those people who don’t know what they are we’ll find a viable land-mass and they can go there – we could call it Statopia.

Germans feel “betrayed” by the EU. Who doesn’t?

I’m mildly surprised that Armenia has been left alone until now.  According to this article “eyebrows have been raised in Brussels” so it won’t be long now.

The secret decision-making processes of the EU are criticised, again, but I don’t think they’ll let little things like democracy and transparency bother them.

“…Bunyan highlights the widespread EU practice of concluding secret deals in ‘trilogues’ involving the parliament, the council and the commission. These mystical meetings are attended by up to 50 officials and are never announced. There is no public agenda and no indication of where the meeting takes place. The minutes are of course never published, and in some cases not even the resulting agreement is released if considered too sensitive. More than 80 per cent of the legislation followed by Statewatch involves this cloak-and-dagger procedure, Bunyan says.”

According to a Mr Emerson, associate senior research fellow at the Centre for European Policy Studies in Brussels, the UK’s opt-out of Schengen is damaging our economy.    He implies that tourists are too lazy to apply for a separate visa to visit Britain.  Emerson should have a word with the ONS; they seem convinced that tourists and earnings from tourists are increasing.  By the way, ONS, is there really any need for such in-depth analysis – couldn’t half of you be usefully sacked?

The Commission is throwing more money at countries with economic problems.

“[The EC] said yesterday it would raise the EU’s contribution to jointly financed development projects for Ireland and five other troubled countries, offering them hundreds of millions of euro in additional funding.

The EU executive said it wanted to increase the level of EU funding of projects in Ireland, Greece and Portugal, as well as in Romania, Latvia and Hungary, to help boost growth in those countries.

One liners:

Where’s Boris, and does he have relatives in Lithuania?
Solar energy won’t work without taxpayer subsidies
Patenting genes given the go-ahead
One senior investment banker is more blunt: “People are scared that the government doesn’t know what the fuck it’s doing.”
“Not in commercial interests” for us to know who’s buying NHS blood products
The EU announces further sanctions on Syria

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