Category Archives: Douglas Carswell MP

Under The Radar

When events such as those in Norway take place info is slipped out or goes unremarked in the general cacophony.  One news item that’s being slipped out under cover of darkness is that we now have Regional Surveillance Units. I’m sure we’re all thrilled to know that Police Forces have combined in an effort to make life safer for us all.  Personally, it will comfort me no end to know that these Units have the power to:

“…make it easier for the authorities to bug computers, break into properties and interfere with wireless internet networks as part of countersurveillance operations…”

As one commenter said, “ROFL, you could not make this shit up.”

One other aspect is that regionalisation goes on regardless.  There was one referendum in the North-East that resulted in a vote against breaking England up into nine Regions but governments just ignore it and carry on, as if the referendum had never happened.  Where have I come across that before?  Don’t be lulled into thinking that the European Union Bill with its ‘referendum lock’ will be much different.  For a referendum to be approved it first has to visit the lawyer’s office, then it goes to a debate & vote in the House and Government Ministers will have the final say.  If they all say ‘yes’ then we’ll have our referendum but if one of them says ‘no’, we won’t.

This isn’t really news in that it’s apparently inconsequential and hasn’t been reported:
“We believe that decisions on which flags and logos are worn or displayed at big sporting occasions are for individual competing teams and event organisers to make, not the European Union.”  I infer from Lord Howell’s comment that the government is happy to imply that it disapproves but has effectively washed its hands of the EU proposal that sporting events should fly the EU flag and the flag be shown as a logo on kit.  I could be wrong but I smell someone passing the buck.

The dynamic duo of stalking horses seem to have taken recent criticism to heart:
Carswell: Since becoming an MP, I have come to see how public policy is rarely made in the interests of the public.
Hannan: Climate change, fake charities, nazis and Chris Huhne.

Last but not least is the news that the new head of  IPSA (who took over only last month) is watering down scrutiny of MPs’ expenses.  Perhaps they think we’ve forgotten how fraudulent and corrupt they are capable of being.  Some of us still think that more of them should have been in Court.  Some of us still think that the jail sentences were a joke.  Some of us still think that too many got away scot-free.  Some of us still think that the guilty haven’t paid the price.

PS: I’m glad to see that scientists have found God.  I’m sure Richard Dawkins is delighted.

Den Plirono

Things have been hotting up in Greece all day and tear gas has been used against protesters. Anti-austerity measure MPs have deserted the government benches for the Opposition, leaving them with a majority of only four. The EU has been unable to reach agreement on the second bail-out and will be meeting again on Friday 17th to try to reach a compromise.

Pics, videos and live streaming
Live streaming

In related news, Douglas Carswell has blogged about the true cost of the bailouts to the UK.

“It’s only a contingent liability” they told us. “Bailing out the Eurozone won’t cost us real money that might otherwise fund public services.”

Oh yes? Then why is the UK having to almost double our IMF subscription from £10.5 Billion to £19.7 Billion?

Yesterday’s draft Statutory Instrument on our International Monetary Fund (Increase in Subscription) proposes we stump up “a further subscription of 9,416,600,000 special drawing rights”. Published quietly in the House of Commons, it can’t hide the fact that that means an increase of £9.2 Billion in real money*.

Remember that next time local services are cut where you live. Think of the tax cuts we could afford with that £9.2 Billion? Or, if you prefer, of the guarantees we could give to maintain public services?

Instead that large chunk of taxpayers’ wealth is going to be used to prop up the Eurozone. Is this what the IMF is for?

We borrow money we don’t have, to pay vast subs to an organisation not designed to prop up the Eurozone, in order to keep together a monetary union we chose not to join. Who is in charge?

* – value calculated at SDR (Special Drawing Right) conversion rate of SDR1 = £0.98

Our MPs and government ministers really should have read the Lisbon Treaty before they cravenly acquiesced in its signing off. The government now finds it’s fighting a rearguard action to prevent the EU implementing rules which confer the right to demand the presence of any member-state’s finance minister. Osborne could well find himself called before the EU to explain himself and the country’s economic strategy: surveillance & monitoring. If only the government read blogs; plenty of us have been warning of this.

The European Parliament is particularly insistent that governments should have to come to Brussels to publicly justify any departure or deviation from EU guidance on how best to manage their national policies.

Under draft rules, Mr Osborne could be compelled to appear before the EU assembly’s monetary affairs committee to explain himself in an “economic dialogue” with MEPs.

UPDATE: Ruth Lea has a good article on the dilemma facing Greece/EU.

Den Plirono

Things have been hotting up in Greece all day and tear gas has been used against protesters. Anti-austerity measure MPs have deserted the government benches for the Opposition, leaving them with a majority of only four. The EU has been unable to reach agreement on the second bail-out and will be meeting again on Friday 17th to try to reach a compromise.

Pics, videos and live streaming
Live streaming

In related news, Douglas Carswell has blogged about the true cost of the bailouts to the UK.

“It’s only a contingent liability” they told us. “Bailing out the Eurozone won’t cost us real money that might otherwise fund public services.”

Oh yes? Then why is the UK having to almost double our IMF subscription from £10.5 Billion to £19.7 Billion?

Yesterday’s draft Statutory Instrument on our International Monetary Fund (Increase in Subscription) proposes we stump up “a further subscription of 9,416,600,000 special drawing rights”. Published quietly in the House of Commons, it can’t hide the fact that that means an increase of £9.2 Billion in real money*.

Remember that next time local services are cut where you live. Think of the tax cuts we could afford with that £9.2 Billion? Or, if you prefer, of the guarantees we could give to maintain public services?

Instead that large chunk of taxpayers’ wealth is going to be used to prop up the Eurozone. Is this what the IMF is for?

We borrow money we don’t have, to pay vast subs to an organisation not designed to prop up the Eurozone, in order to keep together a monetary union we chose not to join. Who is in charge?

* – value calculated at SDR (Special Drawing Right) conversion rate of SDR1 = £0.98

Our MPs and government ministers really should have read the Lisbon Treaty before they cravenly acquiesced in its signing off. The government now finds it’s fighting a rearguard action to prevent the EU implementing rules which confer the right to demand the presence of any member-state’s finance minister. Osborne could well find himself called before the EU to explain himself and the country’s economic strategy: surveillance & monitoring. If only the government read blogs; plenty of us have been warning of this.

The European Parliament is particularly insistent that governments should have to come to Brussels to publicly justify any departure or deviation from EU guidance on how best to manage their national policies.

Under draft rules, Mr Osborne could be compelled to appear before the EU assembly’s monetary affairs committee to explain himself in an “economic dialogue” with MEPs.

UPDATE: Ruth Lea has a good article on the dilemma facing Greece/EU.

>British Nationalists

>Newsnight’s lead item last night was the EU budget demand. It isn’t YouTubed so here’s a link to BBC iPlayer. Douglas Carswell makes an appearance at 3:43 spelling out the danger to Cameron from his own backbenchers. Then, at roughly 7:20, Maitlis interviewed Patrizio Fiorilli (“a European Commission spokesman”). Apart from having a smirking face that I’d like to slap (note how his smile falls away dramatically at the end of the i/view – about 12:15) Fiorilli also gave some really duff answers.

Speaking of whom, Andrew Duff, intense pro-federalist and ALDE leader in the EP, had these words to say (5:39):

“There isn’t any growth in this famous ‘gravy train’ that British nationalists are so frightened of and contemptuous of. The budget of the EU is primarily for the boosting of the economic recovery.”

It’s Duff’s use of the word ‘nationalists’ in this context that I’m querying.  The language of these europrats undergoes subtle change every time they open their mouths.  Eurosceptic one day, xenophobes, sour Little Englanders, extremists, nationalists, terrorists the next.

Breaking down a nation’s culture and identity is one of the planks of  EU policy so that its people become fragmented without a sense of historical ties and so easier to absorb into the machine.  They undermine the will and determination of people who, if they dare to disagree, are simply ignored so that an air of inevitability hangs over the integration process.  They want us to be cowed, to shrug our shoulders and say, “Oh well, what can we do – mustn’t grumble.”

I’d like to remind tptb again of the words of this poem by Kipling.  These words are as true today as they ever were:

It was not part of their blood,
It came to them very late
With long arrears to make good,
When the English began to hate.

They were not easily moved,
They were icy-willing to wait
Till every count should be proved,
Ere the English began to hate.

Their voices were even and low,
Their eyes were level and straight.
There was neither sign nor show,
When the English began to hate.

It was not preached to the crowd,
It was not taught by the State.
No man spoke it aloud,
When the English began to hate.

It was not suddenly bred,
It will not swiftly abate,
Through the chill years ahead,
When Time shall count from the date
That the English began to hate. 

avatars: animated images: cats: Cat Files it's nails
Gif from Avatar Farm

UPDATE: The Fiorilli i/view on YouTube

>Bill Cash: Urgent Question

>Conservative Home has some good quotes and links following on from Bill Cash’s Urgent Question on EU economic governance this afternoon.  Philip Davies, Con, Shipley, asked the question we’d all like answered while Mark Hoban, the Financial Secretary, was content to stay within the safe boundaries of government nu-speak:

Philip Davies:
“Whenever the Minister defends this country from a power grab and a cash grab by the European Union, he will have the enthusiastic support of Members on these Benches. Some of us are rather nervous, however, because when the Conservatives were in opposition, they opposed the European External Action Service, yet they sang its praises when introducing it in the House not long ago. They also opposed giving more money to the European Union, yet they recently rubber-stamped an increase through this House that had been agreed by the previous Government. Does the Minister agree that his Government should be judged on what they do, and not on what they say?”

 
Videos: Liar Politicians

Here’s an article by Jonathan Isaby with a few more details and here is a .pdf of van Rompuy’s own fair work: Strengthening EU Economic Governance

>PMQs: Verdict + Videos

>

Another win for Cameron this week – it’s too easy and Miliband is no match.

Harriet Baldwin, Con, West Worcestershire had the first question and gave Cameron a chance to blow the coalition trumpet about economic growth figures.

Miliband’s questions all related to the plans for Housing Benefit  & Welfare Reform but he only tied himself up in knots with a little help from Cameron, an old Labour internal memo and the email leaked to the Times this morning in which Miliband was advised on how to handle PMQs*.  Miliband tried to change tack by drawing attention to unhappy Libdems – Hughes and Clegg in particular (‘Glum and Glummer’, ‘back on the fags’).  Once again it was very noisy: the Labour benches weren’t comfortable at all and Speaker Bercow intervened: “Members must remain , if not serene, at any rate calm at all times”.
* “It’s important to have a cheer-line that goes down well in the Chamber.”
“You’ve got to have something that can be clipped easily by the broadcasters.”
“It’s important to get to your feet looking as though you’re seizing on something new.”

The EU won’t go away, no matter how often Cameron tries to deflect questions.  It was raised again by backbenchers  and it was pointed out that Labour MEPs voted to increase the EU budget this week. One other noteworthy jab was at Angus Robertson, the SNP Westminster Leader, when Cameron ridiculed the notion of an independent Scotland  (“I have to say to the honourable gentleman that if we had an independent Scotland you wouldn’t be flying planes, you’d be flying by the seat of your pants.”)

Did your MP ask a question?

Christopher Pincher, Con, Tamworth; David Blunkett, Lab, Sheffield Brightside & Hillsborough;  Tessa Munt, LibDem, Wells;  Eric Illsley, Ind, Barnsley Central;  Andrew Turner, Con, Isle of Wight;  Kate Hoey, Lab, Vauxhall;  Andrew Bingham, Con, High Peak;  Angus Robertson, SNP, Moray, Westminster Leader;  Julian Huppert, LibDem, Cambridge;  Paul Goggins, Lab, Wythenshawe & Sale East;  David Rutley Con, Macclesfield;  Luciana Berger, Lab Co-op, Liverpool Wavertree;   Rehman Chishti, Con, Gillingham & Rainham;  Siobhain McDonagh, Lab, Mitchem & Morden;  Mark Pawsey, Con, Rugby;  Emma Reynolds, Lab, Wolverhampton North East;   Neil Carmichael, Con, Stroud; Tom Harris, Lab, Glasgow South;  Sajid  Javid, Con, Bromsgrove;  Robert Flello, Lab, Stoke-on-Trent South;   Alun Cairns, Con, Vale of Glamorgan;  Sharon Hodgson, Lab, Washington & Sunderland West;  Bob Russell, LibDem, Colchester;

Topics raised:
A new Ocado store & 2,000 new jobs in Tamworth;  anomalies raised by devolved budgets; winter deaths of elderly people; transfer of Yorkshire Forward funds to Local Enterprise Partnerships; the need of a Treaty change to take account of proposed EU economic sanctions; the EU budget; councils sharing services to drive down costs;  the closure of RAF Lossiemouth and loss of jobs;  implementation of Labour’s intrusive monitoring & surveillance;  the end of Child Trust Funds;  future of BAE in Macclesfield; tax relief on video game development;  Thames Estuary airport;  Sri Lanka war crimes tribunal;  planning for gypsy/traveller sites; cuts to school funding in Wolverhampton;  FE colleges in Stroud;  Conservative support for Labour spending plans;  S&P’s credit upgrade of UK;  schools in Stoke-on-Trent;  support for the private sector; bank taxation & child trust funds;  housing benefits cuts & homeless children.

Followed by an Urgent Question from Bill Cash, Con, Stone & Chairman of the European Scrutiny Committee:  What negotiating position does the government intend to adopt regarding economic governance and the Stability & Growth Pact in the EU?

The government’s response was given by Financial Secretary, Mark Hoban and he essentially said that the govt supported the aims of the EU regarding sanctions against euro-zone members and that the proposals would not affect Britain, that Britain would be exempted.  (This despite van Rompuy stating yesterday that the changes would initially apply to euro-zone states and then be extended EU-wide).

Cash was unimpressed.

Videos of PMQs to follow as and when they become available.

Cameron – Robertson:

(This video by SNP supporter)

Cameron – Miliband:

Part 1
Part 2
Thanks to Liar Politicians

>Keep Tweaking The Curtain

>There’s quite a bit in the press today about the economy and jobs but no-one ever looks behind the curtain. Cameron knows what’s going on, as did Blair and Brown, but when people look around for someone to blame and their eyes fall on the nearest subject, eg, the Labour Party and Gordon Brown, they’re missing the bigger picture. Politicians are guilty of complicity but they’re not the instigators. They are a distraction; they’re chaff thrown up to take the flak while the banking cartels escape real scrutiny.

They’re all rewarded though.  Seats are kept warm for them in global organisations: the IMF, the WTO, the EU, NATO.  They won’t be taxed to within an inch of their lives; they won’t feel a cut in public services (who was the last politician to catch a bus?) and the police will be on their doorstep like a shot if they report a crime.   The whole thing stinks.

Daily Telegraph 1
Daily Mail
Daily Telegraph 2
The Independent

Watch the language:

Do you really think this doesn’t apply to Britain too? Do you really think we are immune?

Next week at the Conservative Party conference and in three weeks when the Comprehensive Spending Review is detailed, does anyone think the government will say anything other than, ‘the previous govt is to blame’; ‘we must all tighten our belts’; ‘we’re all in this together’? I don’t. I don’t expect any meaningful reform of the banking sector either – even Carswell’s proposed Bank of England Act 2010 is only a half-way measure.

When our elected representatives suck up to indicted war criminals in the name of big business you have to wonder what happened to ethics and morality in government and how we can turn things around in a peaceful way.

PS I see that, amongst many other things, I haven’t mentioned corporatism in this post, so here it is: Corporatism.