Category Archives: politicians in general

Patience Is A Virtue

Here’s a song I’ve posted before. It seems a good day for it while our Leaders are congratulating themselves on a job “well-done”. They should be reminded that, in the eyes of many people, they should go to trial. I’d happily dig their bodies out of a bombed-out hidey-hole and say ‘que sera sera’ but I’d rather they went to trial too.

I hope you enjoy the song; it was a Sunday Reflection … the caveat is that it only applies if the people don’t get to them first:

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Finished

I’ve been going downhill faster than my opinions on the blog so I suppose it was only to be expected that there’d come a day when everything shut down. I’ll try and stick with PMQs and the Sundays but, beyond that, I can’t say.

My life used to be measured, not by coffee spoons or politics but by music and poetry. I’ve spent three years chronicling our venal Parliament and the EU, trying to warn about what was to come. It’s  apparent for all to see now but I still need to find a home, somewhere with a big garden and a big kitchen so I can grow and cook to my heart’s content, with people to love and people who love me.

I think it was Twitter & The GV News that finally did it with an overload of economic and political info – that and still living out of two suitcases and sleeping on a sofabed with no access to a garden almost a year after coming home to England.

On the bright side, here’s the RPA, conducted by Andrew Lytton playing Bach’s “Sleepers Awake!”  I hope we do.

Finished

I’ve been going downhill faster than my opinions on the blog so I suppose it was only to be expected that there’d come a day when everything shut down. I’ll try and stick with PMQs and the Sundays but, beyond that, I can’t say.

My life used to be measured, not by coffee spoons or politics but by music and poetry. I’ve spent three years chronicling our venal Parliament and the EU, trying to warn about what was to come. It’s  apparent for all to see now but I still need to find a home, somewhere with a big garden and a big kitchen so I can grow and cook to my heart’s content, with people to love and people who love me.

I think it was Twitter & The GV News that finally did it with an overload of economic and political info – that and still living out of two suitcases and sleeping on a sofabed with no access to a garden almost a year after coming home to England.

On the bright side, here’s the RPA, conducted by Andrew Lytton playing Bach’s “Sleepers Awake!”  I hope we do.

PS – Still calling Harbinger!

Patience is a virtue

At last, I truly know the meaning of that old adage. The EU has taught me many things!

I used to think it meant being, kind, tolerant and accommodating of others but I was wrong. What it really means is to retain your sanity in the overwhelming face of frustrating f/wittery from politicians. It means not dashing out into the streets screeching at people to lift up their eyes. It means being able to resist the impulse to dash out naked into the garden at midnight and howl like a loon at the moon.

You can tell I’ve been dipping into the papers again, can’t you? I’ve also been watching the Labour Party Conference, live on BBC504, so it’s my own fault. I’ve heard Liam Byrne, Maria Eagle and assorted Yorkshire/Scottish union members spouting the politics of whinge and envy. I’ve also heard Glenys Willmott MEP and Labour Leader in the EU talk about achieving “great things” and “social democracy”.  According to Willmott, “the Progressive Left must never be satisfied” and war, of course, had another mention.

Harman is in a league of her own – hears nothing, speaks rubbish and sees inequality wherever she goes.  Here’s a hint for Harriet and Lefties like her:

A man who was travelling came upon a farmer working in his field and asked him what the people in the next village were like. The farmer asked “What were the people like in the last village you visited?”. The man responded “They were kind, friendly, generous, great people.” “You’ll find the people in the next village are the same,” said the farmer. 

Another man who was travelling to the same village came up to the same farmer and asked him what the people in the next village were like. Again the farmer asked “What were the people like in the last village you visited?”. The second man responded “They were rude, unfriendly, dishonest people.”. “You’ll find the people in the next village are the same,” said the farmer.

While they’re busy blaming each other they’re not looking for real solutions to the problems, but that assumes a genuine intent to clear up the mess for the benefit of the people and not just stiff us for more taxes. On past performance that’s very unlikely.

The problem is – they’re the problem; they and their ideologies. Lib/Lab/Con = the unholy trinity of British politics.

When I started the blog I said I would never tell anyone what to do, but I am now:

STOP VOTING LIB/LAB/CON, please

My sanity really can’t take much more.  I don’t care whether it’s local elections, General Elections or elections to the PTA, just stop voting these f/wits into office.

Wouldn’t it be good if failed politicians, ie those kicked out and rejected in elections, weren’t allowed to stand for office (or, as they like to call it, ‘power’) ever again?

Ian Gray, the Labour leader in Scotland: “I believe Labour is strong enough to stand across all of these islands together.” What islands would those be? Wales, England, Scotland and Northern Ireland aren’t islands, they’re a part of the British Isles. It’s just more empty words, playing to the stupid gallery who hear what they want to hear and applaud like trained seals – it’s hoping for a standing ovation and a slot on the evening news along with the rest of them.

An English cat expresses her opinion of politics

By nature we English are a patient people and we put up with a great deal but when the straw breaks the camel’s back I wouldn’t like to be in the firing line.

Ed Balls: How to get us out of the mess I helped to create but they’re not manifesto pledges or serious policy proposals
Janet Daley: It’s all balls
Rolling updates from the DT: Conference live

Patience Is A Virtue

At last, I truly know the meaning of that old adage. The EU has taught me many things!

I used to think it meant being, kind, tolerant and accommodating of others but I was wrong. What it really means is to retain your sanity in the overwhelming face of frustrating f/wittery from politicians. It means not dashing out into the streets screeching at people to lift up their eyes. It means being able to resist the impulse to dash out naked into the garden at midnight and howl like a loon at the moon.

You can tell I’ve been dipping into the papers again. I’ve also been watching the Labour Party Conference, live on BBC504, so it’s my own fault. I’ve heard Liam Byrne, Maria Eagle and assorted Yorkshire/Scottish union members spouting the politics of whinge and envy. I’ve also heard Glenys Willmott MEP and Labour Leader in the EU talk about achieving “great things” and “social democracy”.  According to Willmott, “the Progressive Left must never be satisfied” and war, of course, had another mention.

Harman is in a league of her own – hears nothing, speaks rubbish and sees inequality wherever she goes.  Here’s a hint for Harriet and Lefties like her:

A man who was travelling came upon a farmer working in his field and asked him what the people in the next village were like. The farmer asked “What were the people like in the last village you visited?”. The man responded “They were kind, friendly, generous, great people.” “You’ll find the people in the next village are the same,” said the farmer. 

Another man who was travelling to the same village came up to the same farmer and asked him what the people in the next village were like. Again the farmer asked “What were the people like in the last village you visited?”. The second man responded “They were rude, unfriendly, dishonest people.”. “You’ll find the people in the next village are the same,” said the farmer.

While they’re busy blaming each other they’re not looking for real solutions to the problems, but that assumes a genuine intent to clear up the mess for the benefit of the people and not just stiff us for more taxes. On past performance that’s very unlikely.

The problem is – they’re the problem; they and their ideologies. Lib/Lab/Con = the unholy trinity of British politics.

When I started the blog I said I would never tell anyone what to do, but I am now:

STOP VOTING LIB/LAB/CON, please

My sanity really can’t take much more.  I don’t care whether it’s local elections, General Elections or elections to the PTA, just stop voting these f/wits into office.

Wouldn’t it be good if failed politicians, ie those kicked out and rejected in elections, weren’t allowed to stand for office (or, as they like to call it, ‘power’) ever again?

Ian Gray, the Labour leader in Scotland: “I believe Labour is strong enough to stand across all of these islands together.” What islands would those be? Wales, England, Scotland and Northern Ireland aren’t islands, they’re a part of the British Isles. It’s just more empty words, playing to the stupid gallery who hear what they want to hear and applaud like trained seals – it’s hoping for a standing ovation and a slot on the evening news along with the rest of them.

An English cat expresses her opinion of politics

By nature we English are a patient people and we put up with a great deal but when the straw breaks the camel’s back I wouldn’t like to be in the firing line.

Ed Balls: How to get us out of the mess I helped to create but they’re not manifesto pledges or serious policy proposals
Janet Daley: It’s all balls
Rolling updates from the DT: Conference live

For the record

As rumoured, George Osborne is one of the high-profile Ministers set to lose his seat if the boundary changes are passed – they’ve yet to be debated in the Commons so we can expect a packed House for that, unlike some other topics where MPs can’t be bothered to attend.

Some of the MPs most affected are:

George Osborne
Hilary Benn
Ed Balls
Nick Clegg
Zak Goldsmith
Caroline Lucas
Vince Cable
Sadiq Khan
Chuku Umunna
Ian Duncan-Smith
Chris Huhne
Nadine Dorries
Tim Farron
Rory Stewart
Liam Byrne

A “senior Tory”, as usual unnamed, said:

“We are not happy about this. There are MPs who gave up a lot to come here and now it looks like they face real fights. Whips have been coming up to us and asking how we are taking this. Not well is the message.”

The MP said it was possible that the changes might be dropped. “This is far more wide-ranging than anyone had thought. It wouldn’t surprise me if this is dropped. They’ll just say it is all too complicated and they’ll come back to it after the election.”

The number of constituencies will be cut from 533 to 502 and the number of MPs from 650 to 600.  The changes formed part of the Coalition manifesto which they agreed after taking office – the LibDems agreeing to support it in return for the referendum on Alternative Voting.  Sour grapes at losing that vote means that some LibDems are now threatening to vote against the changes.  Such reliable partners. 

Another consequence of the reform is that English County lines are once again being blurred by politics: Cornwall and Devon aren’t happy.

You can find out if or how you might be affected HERE.

Conservative Home has an informative article by an elections analyst, which is worth a glance:

These reviews will become more regular. They will now be held every 5 years but there will be further change to electoral law in this Parliament.  Individual voter registration will probably be introduced in two years time. This will I hope reduce abuse in not only voter registration but also postal voting and campaign irregularities. All of these are now rife in many places and make our elections more ‘corrupt’ than in many developing countries.

I’m not sure why he bothered to put the word  ‘corrupt’ in inverted commas; it’s widely acknowledged that postal voting has corrupted the electoral process to a degree never known before in British politics.

Another, or possibly the same, unnamed ‘senior Tory’ source  said (£):

“It has been really difficult to get MPs to focus on the big issues when all they want to know about is whether they’ll still have a seat.  Some of the usual rebels could suddenly find themselves in trouble when they are looking to the party for a new seat or a place in the Lords.”

And that’s it in a nutshell: no real concern about representation of the people or the disregard of natural geographical County boundaries, just a concern for their own skins.

UPDATE 14th: Cameron warns Clegg not to dispute new boundaries

For The Record

As rumoured, George Osborne is one of the high-profile Ministers set to lose his seat if the boundary changes are passed – they’ve yet to be debated in the Commons so we can expect a packed House for that, unlike some other topics where MPs can’t be bothered to attend.

Some of the MPs most affected are:

George Osborne
Hilary Benn
Ed Balls
Nick Clegg
Zak Goldsmith
Caroline Lucas
Vince Cable
Sadiq Khan
Chuku Umunna
Ian Duncan-Smith
Chris Huhne
Nadine Dorries
Tim Farron
Rory Stewart
Liam Byrne

A “senior Tory”, as usual unnamed, said:

“We are not happy about this. There are MPs who gave up a lot to come here and now it looks like they face real fights. Whips have been coming up to us and asking how we are taking this. Not well is the message.”

The MP said it was possible that the changes might be dropped. “This is far more wide-ranging than anyone had thought. It wouldn’t surprise me if this is dropped. They’ll just say it is all too complicated and they’ll come back to it after the election.”

The number of constituencies will be cut from 533 to 502 and the number of MPs from 650 to 600.  The changes formed part of the Coalition manifesto which they agreed after taking office – the LibDems agreeing to support it in return for the referendum on Alternative Voting.  Sour grapes at losing that vote means that some LibDems are now threatening to vote against the changes.  Such reliable partners. 

Another consequence of the reform is that English County lines are once again being blurred by politics: Cornwall and Devon aren’t happy.

You can find out if or how you might be affected HERE.

Conservative Home has an informative article by an elections analyst, which is worth a glance:

These reviews will become more regular. They will now be held every 5 years but there will be further change to electoral law in this Parliament.  Individual voter registration will probably be introduced in two years time. This will I hope reduce abuse in not only voter registration but also postal voting and campaign irregularities. All of these are now rife in many places and make our elections more ‘corrupt’ than in many developing countries.

I’m not sure why he bothered to put the word  ‘corrupt’ in inverted commas; it’s widely acknowledged that postal voting has corrupted the electoral process to a degree never known before in British politics.

Another, or possibly the same, unnamed ‘senior Tory’ source  said (£):

“It has been really difficult to get MPs to focus on the big issues when all they want to know about is whether they’ll still have a seat.  Some of the usual rebels could suddenly find themselves in trouble when they are looking to the party for a new seat or a place in the Lords.”

And that’s it in a nutshell: no real concern about representation of the people or the disregard of natural geographical County boundaries, just a concern for their own skins.

UPDATE 14th: Cameron warns Clegg not to dispute new boundaries